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Engagement with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Communities

Key findings

The Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit (ACCU) at Cancer Care Ontario has developed Relationship Protocols, a Letter of Relationship, and a Memorandum of Understanding in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership. These documents formalize sustainable relationships with First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners through mutual respect, recognition and understanding. They highlight Cancer Care Ontario’s commitment to establishing the strong foundation necessary for achieving common goals and objectives towards the delivery of cancer services with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples across the province.

Measure:  Number of regions with Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans developed and finalized

 

Desired Direction:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards. This indicates that desired direction for this action is upwards.

 

As of this Report:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards in a yellow box. This indicates that there has been an increase in performance over the previous periods identified and this action is below but approaching target or has notable regional variation.

In this spirit, the ACCU has also been working closely with Regional Cancer Programs (RCPs) to build regional capacity supporting engagement with local First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities and organizations. Together, the ACCU and RCPs are collaborating with local First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities and organizations to develop and implement initiatives that will address the unique cancer control issues and needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis people living within each region. These initiatives are detailed within Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans, which are currently being developed collaboratively within 12 of the province’s 13 RCPs.* These regional partnerships continue to be strengthened as most regions with Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans have (with the support of the ACCU) initiated direct engagement with the core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables in their regions to develop and implement this work together.

*Note: The Toronto Central North and Toronto Central South RCPs are combined.

Who are the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Ontario?

Three groups are recognized by Canada’s Constitution Act of 1982 as “the Aboriginal peoples of Canada,” who are explicitly defined as “the Indian [now referred to as “First Nations”], Inuit, and Métis peoples.” Together, the First Nations, Inuit and Métis people experience significantly poorer health outcomes than their non-Aboriginal peers, including lower life expectancy and a higher burden of chronic conditions [1, 2]. The lack of First Nations, Inuit and Métis-specific health data continues to hamper our collective ability to accurately determine and effectively address chronic disease prevention priorities in these at-risk populations.

Measure:  Number of regions with newly developed but not yet finalized Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans

 

Desired Direction:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards. This indicates that desired direction for this action is upwards.

 

As of this Report:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards in a yellow box. This indicates that there has been an increase in performance over the previous periods identified and this action is below but approaching target or has notable regional variation.

First Nations

Prior to contact with Europeans, First Nations in what is now defined as Ontario represented diverse and stable communities whose economy and governance were sound and thriving. The arrival of Europeans and the resulting policies of assimilation, such as the residential school system, dramatically impacted the way of life of First Nations people and all aspects of their health.

Today there are 133 First Nations communities in Ontario, 126 of which have independently recognized land bases. As of 2016, there are approximately 236,680 people residing in Ontario who identify as First Nations, of whom approximately half live on-reserve or on Crown lands [3]. According to the 2016 Census, there were 85,475 people who self-identified as First Nations but were not registered under the Indian Act [4].* Almost half of registered First Nations people in Ontario who are on-reserve live in communities that are urban [5]. Over one-quarter live in special access communities (no year-round road access to a service centre) (28%) [5]. First Nations people in Ontario are young, with an average age of 32 years (compared to 40.5 years for non-Aboriginal Ontarians) [4].

*Note: Canadian Census data may underestimate First Nations population numbers.

Métis

The genesis of Métis culture and nation dates back to the 1600s, when early European settlers first came into contact with local First Nations communities. Early unions between these predominantly male fur-trading European settlers and local First Nations women led to the emergence of a new and highly distinctive Aboriginal people with a unique identity and consciousness. Distinct Métis settlements began to appear throughout what was then called “the Northwest.” They subsequently spread throughout what is now defined as Ontario, as Métis settlements sprung up along the rivers and watersheds surrounding the Great Lakes and in the northwest of the province. Historical Métis communities were closely connected through the highly mobile fur trade network, seasonal rounds, extensive kinship connections, and a collective identity characterized by a common culture, language and unique way of life that was influenced by a complex blend of traditions from both sides of the Atlantic. The strong family connections and the unique Métis way of life that characterized these original Métis settlements form the foundation of the Métis nation we know today and remain strongly evident in contemporary Métis life.

Measure:  Number of regions where all core First Nation, Inuit and Métis Health Tables are engaged

 

Desired Direction:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards. This indicates that desired direction for this action is upwards.

 

As of this Report:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards in a yellow box. This indicates that there has been an increase in performance over the previous periods identified and this action is below but approaching target or has notable regional variation.

The Métis population is one of the fastest growing populations in Canada, having nearly doubled in size from 2006 to 2016 [4]. This rapid growth is largely due to people changing their reported identity to Métis between Census years – a phenomenon known as “ethnic mobility.” In 2016, Ontario had the largest number of Métis living in Canada, with 120,585 people – 20.5% of all Métis. The Métis population of Ontario was relatively young, with an average age of 36.5 years [4]. In 2006, nearly 70% of the Métis population in Canada lived in urban areas, less than the non-Aboriginal population (81%). However, Métis living in urban areas were twice as likely to live in smaller urban centres with populations of less than 100,000 residents (41%) than were urban non-Aboriginal people (20%) [6].

Inuit

Inuit in Ontario constitute a small but fast-growing population. According to the 2016 Census, 65,025 people in Canada (3,860 in Ontario) identified as being Inuit [4].* Inuit are a young population, with an average age of 29 years [4]. Rapid Inuit population growth and the corresponding young age structure are demographic trends that are expected well into the future. The Inuit population in Ontario continues to grow through high fertility rates and migration away from Inuit Nunangat (“the place where Inuit live”). Inuit Nunangat is made up of 4 regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region (including parts of Northwest Territories and Yukon), Nunavut, Nunavik (Northern Quebec) and Nunatsiavut (Labrador). In 2016, over one-quarter (27%) of self-identifying Inuit in Canada lived in southern Canada, outside of Inuit Nunangat [7]. A growing number of Inuit live in southern urban centres, such as Ottawa and Toronto.

*Note: The Canadian Census data may underestimate Inuit population numbers.

Measure:  Number of regions with a sustainable engagement structure

 

Desired Direction:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards. This indicates that desired direction for this action is upwards.

 

As of this Report:

 

An image of an arrow pointing upwards in a yellow box. This indicates that there has been an increase in performance over the previous periods identified and this action is below but approaching target or has notable regional variation.

Inuit move to southern cities for many reasons. Some go for work, post-secondary education or housing, and many Inuit are living in Ontario due to long-term medical treatment – treatment that is not available in Inuit Nunangat. Most Inuit communities lack access to specialized medical care [10]. The 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey found that Inuit were significantly less likely to have had contact with a medical doctor during the previous year than non-Aboriginal Canadians [11]. Inuit living in the Qikiqtaaluk (Baffin) region of Nunavut primarily travel south to Ottawa for medical treatment via Iqaluit (Figure 1), while those living in the Kivalliq Region (Western region of Hudson Bay) are transferred to Winnipeg and those in the Kitikmeot Region go to Edmonton (via Yellowknife). Inuit in need of complex medical care living in Nunavik or Nunatsiavut travel to Montreal or St John’s, respectively. Due to limited options for post-secondary education in Inuit Nunangat, 50% of Inuit with post-secondary credentials (and 85% of those with a university degree) reported having to relocate for their education [8].

Aboriginal cancer control

The ACCU at Cancer Care Ontario works to improve the cancer system and journey for Ontario’s First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. It also strives to ensure that First Nations, Inuit and Métis people in Ontario have access to high-quality cancer prevention, screening and treatment services that are culturally appropriate and that incorporate the Aboriginal holistic approach to health and well-being. Following a culture-based belief in the interconnection between the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects of life, the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (ACS III) promotes a holistic approach to cancer education, prevention, screening and research. The ACS III builds on the success of previous cancer strategies by continuing on the path towards health equity and well-being for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. As we move forward on this path, Cancer Care Ontario remains committed to improving upon the achievements made through the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy II (ACS II) in the past 3 years, including the following:

  • Establishing Relationship Protocols with First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups across Ontario.
  • Developing Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans in concert with hiring 5 Aboriginal Project Coordinators, 10 Regional Aboriginal Cancer Leads and 10 Aboriginal Navigators.
  • Gaining new knowledge of cancer in First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.
  • Creating Aboriginal Relationship and Cultural Competency courses to increase understanding of history and knowledge in order to improve health outcomes and person-centred care.

Aboriginal Relationship and Cultural Competency courses

Cancer Care Ontario has launched a series of 13 Aboriginal Relationship and Cultural Competency courses online to promote greater awareness of First Nations, Inuit and Métis history, culture and health context in order to help improve health outcomes and person-centred care.

The courses are geared to healthcare providers, professionals, administrators and others working with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people and communities. Each course takes about 60 minutes to complete and is accredited by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Ontario Chapter for up to 13 Mainpro+ credits (1 for each course).

Designed by the ACCU, the courses will help address the great need to understand the underlying history and challenges experienced by First Nation, Inuit and Métis populations. This, in turn, will inform the healthcare system on key issues related to addressing health equity for these populations. As Cancer Care Ontario is committed to developing a cancer system that ensures health equity for all Ontarians, the Aboriginal Relationship and Cultural Competency courses also will address a key recommendation from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada report: providing skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism [9].

Relationship Protocols

Cancer Care Ontario’s ACCU has engaged in the development of Relationship Protocols, which also include a Memorandum of Understanding and Letter of Relationship with (a) Ontario’s First Nations leadership (both Political Territorial Organizations and Independent First Nations), (b) the Métis Nation of Ontario, (c) the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres and (d) Inuit health service providers in Ontario. These Relationship Protocols formalize the working relationships with First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups. The resulting relationships are based on trust and mutual respect, create accountability for the delivery of the Aboriginal Cancer Strategies, and enable a culturally appropriate approach towards addressing cancer control for First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities in the province

The use of a Protocol to formalize relations with First Nation, Inuit and Métis groups was adopted from the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, which recognizes protocol agreements to be:

  • An agreement that recognizes the unique history and ways of life of Aboriginal communities in Ontario.
  • An agreement that sets a new course for a collaborative relationship between the Ontario government and Aboriginal people.
  • An agreement that is intended to improve the well-being of Aboriginal children, families and communities while protecting and promoting the distinct culture, identity and heritage of Aboriginal Peoples.
  • An agreement that encourages partnership opportunities that recognize and respect Aboriginal traditions.

Table 1. Relationship Protocols signed with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Leadership as of March 2018

Organization/First Nation Date of signing
Grand Council Treaty #3 May 2013
Anishinabek Nation (Union of Ontario Indians) June 2013
Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres (OFIFC) July 2014
Nishnawbe Aski Nation August 2014
Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (Big Trout Lake) First Nation October 2014
Métis Nation of Ontario (the agreement signed is a known as a Memorandum of Understanding) February 2015
Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians (agreement signed is known as a Letter of Relationship) November 2016
Inuit Health Service Providers May 7, 2017
Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation February 1, 2018

Regional Aboriginal engagement

Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans are regional blueprints for the implementation of Cancer Care Ontario’s ACS III. They have been developed through close partnerships with core First Nation, Inuit and Métis Health Tables and RCP leadership with the goal of ensuring that First Nations, Inuit and Métis people have a voice in the delivery of cancer services. As such, each plan reflects the unique needs of communities in its respective region. Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans have been developed in the 13 regions* in Ontario, and 11 of these have been finalized.

*Note: The Toronto Central North and Toronto Central South RCPs are combined.

The ACCU has followed a 3 pillar approach to building regional capacity to address cancer control issues/needs.

  1. Meet with RCPs. An initial meeting was held to discuss Aboriginal Cancer Strategy priorities and targets, establish primary contacts and develop a working group within each RCP. The ACCU, in close partnership with the RCP working group, developed a draft Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan to outline steps to make the cancer system more effective and accessible for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people in each region.
  2. Work with established Aboriginal Health Tables. The ACCU identified core Aboriginal Health Tables (First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities, boards, committees, advisory groups, Friendship Centres, Aboriginal Health Access Centres and other Aboriginal groups) to provide guidance and feedback on the Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans before finalization. This ensures that Aboriginal people in each region have a voice in the delivery of cancer services, and it allows the RCPs to engage directly, respectfully and sustainably with First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups.
  3. Build RCP capacity. To address First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer control issues effectively, dedicated resources were established in the RCPs. Aboriginal Navigators provide support for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people with cancer and their families along every step of the cancer journey. Regional Aboriginal Cancer Leads champion the ACS III strategic vision by engaging and collaborating with healthcare providers across the matrix of primary care. Aboriginal Project Coordinator positions have been created within 5 RCPs to support the work of the Regional Aboriginal Cancer Leads. The ACCU also employs 3 Partnership Liaison Officers to support the work of the RCPs and to ensure sustained engagement between the RCPs, ACCU and the First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership, core Health Tables and communities across Ontario.

The ACCU has established regular reporting procedures to ensure that First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership, provincial-level Health Tables and local First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners are engaged and informed regarding the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy progress. This also provides an opportunity to ensure that the partners are able to guide and provide feedback on the implementation of deliverables that impact their communities. As such, the ACCU meets with Political Territorial Organization leadership (Grand Chiefs and Chiefs), First Nations Tribal Councils, local-level core Health Tables and communities, the Métis Nation of Ontario Healing and Wellness Branch, Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres, Inuit service providers and Aboriginal Health Access Centres.

As outlined within the Relationship Protocols signed between Cancer Care Ontario and First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership, the ACCU has committed to providing regular written reports. As such, a written reporting process has been developed to ensure that the First Nations, Inuit and Métis political leadership with whom Cancer Care Ontario has a formal relationship receives an annual report detailing work carried out with, and for, the associated communities. These reports were distributed for the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 fiscal years, and they will be developed based upon activity in the 2017/2018 fiscal year. An annual report was developed for the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres for activities in fiscal year 2016/2017.

A key component of developing and implementing Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans is to ensure that engagement between the RCPs and the core Aboriginal Health Tables is sustained. Structures to sustain the engagement may take the form of developing a regional Aboriginal cancer advisory committee, meeting with local groups that are already established (such as LHIN Aboriginal Health Circles), or holding regular touchpoints with individual community health committees. Regular meetings ensure that progress reports on the implementation of each Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan are provided to First Nations, Inuit, Métis partners, and that these partners have the opportunity to provide feedback and guidance on all work undertaken to address cancer control within their communities. Work undertaken in ACS III will involve working closely with RCPs and core First Nations, Inuit, Métis Health Tables to develop sustainable engagement structures in every region of the province, while continuing to engage closely with those already established.

Figure 1. Southern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – development of a Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

map of ACCU-plandevelopment-south

 

More information regarding the methodology is available.

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercareontario.ca/sites/ccocancercare/files/assets/CCOAboriginalStrategy3.pdf)

 

Figure 2. Northern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – development of a Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

map of ACCU-plandevelopment-north

More information regarding the methodology is available.

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercareontario.ca/sites/ccocancercare/files/assets/CCOAboriginalStrategy3.pdf)

 

Figure 3. Southern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – percentage of core Health Tables engaged, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

map of ACCU-percentengaged-south

More information regarding the methodology is available.

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercareontario.ca/sites/ccocancercare/files/assets/CCOAboriginalStrategy3.pdf)

 

Figure 4. Northern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – percentage of core Health Tables engaged, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

map of ACCU-percentengaged-north

More information regarding the methodology is available.

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercareontario.ca/sites/ccocancercare/files/assets/CCOAboriginalStrategy3.pdf)

 

Figure 5. Implementing and sustaining the engagement process with core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables

graph of Implementing and sustaining the engagement process with core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health

More information regarding the methodology is available.

 

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. ACS=Aboriginal Cancer Strategy

 

Data Table 1. Southern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – development of a Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

LHIN number Region Plan developed (ACS III: 2015-2019) First Nation Communities Political Territorial Organization (PTO) LATITUDE LONGITUDE
1 Erie St. Clair Developed and final Aamjiwnaang First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 42.9657 -82.391671
1 Erie St. Clair Developed and final Bkejwanong Territory (Walpole Island) Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 42.58976 -82.387253
1 Erie St. Clair Developed and final Caldwell First Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 42.039206 -82.589593
1 Erie St. Clair Developed and final Chippewas of Kettle & Stony Point Union of Ontario Indians 43.097971 -81.99934
1 Erie St. Clair Developed and final Delaware Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 42.551851 -81.976501
2 South West Developed and final Chippewas of Nawash Unceded (Cape Croker) Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 44.740129 -81.139782
2 South West Developed and final Chippewas of Saugeen Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 44.49774 -81.36985
2 South West Developed and final Chippewas of theThames Union of Ontario Indians 42.810329 -81.460022
2 South West Developed and final Munsee-Delaware Nation Union of Ontario Indians 42.819799 -81.435871
2 South West Developed and final Oneida Nation of the Thames Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 42.87455 -81.3308074
3 Waterloo Wellington Developed, not final - - - -
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Developed and final Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 43.574875 -79.704483
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Developed and final Six Nations of the Grand River Territory Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 42.891138 -79.977137
5--6 Mississauga Halton--Central West Developed, not final - - - -
7 Toronto Central Developed and final - - - -
8 Central Developed and final Chippewas of Georgina Island Union of Ontario Indians 44.304861 -79.361229
9 Central East Developed and final Alderville First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 44.199454 -77.499322
9 Central East Developed and final Curve Lake First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 44.624774 -78.133402
9 Central East Developed and final Hiawatha First Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 44.240141 -78.163208
9 Central East Developed and final Mississaugas of Scugog Island Union of Ontario Indians 44.114758 -78.945436
10 South East Developed and final Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 44.19458 -77.04929
11 Champlain Developed and final Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.593347 -77.191787
11 Champlain Developed and final Mohawks of Akwesasne Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 45.031202 -74.704966
12 North Simcoe Muskoka Developed and final Beausoleil First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 44.686796 -79.547845
12 North Simcoe Muskoka Developed and final Chippewas of Rama Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 44.686796 -79.547845
12 North Simcoe Muskoka Developed and final Moose Deer Point First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.072514 -79.627613
12 North Simcoe Muskoka Developed and final Wahta Mohawks (Mohawks of Gibson) Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 45.152695 -79.481419

 

LHIN number Region Plan developed (ACS III: 2015-2019) Métis Communities LATITUDE LONGITUDE
1 Erie St. Clair Developed and final Windsor Essex Métis Council 42.232803 -83.023308
2 South West Developed and final Great Lakes Métis Council 44.566215 -80.939613
3 Waterloo Wellington Developed, not final Grand River Community Métis Council 43.690869 -80.371735
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Developed and final Hamilton/Wentworth Métis Council 43.242023 -79.856201
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Developed and final Niagara Region Métis Council 42.990954 -79.250818
5--6 Mississauga Halton--Central West Developed, not final Credit River Métis Council 43.642785 -79.629926
7 Toronto Central Developed and final Toronto Métis Council 43.727595 -79.30994
8 Central Developed and final - - -
9 Central East Developed and final Oshawa & Durham Region Métis Council 43.933059 -78.868285
9 Central East Developed and final Wapiti Interim Métis Council 44.624774 -78.133402
10 South East Developed and final Northumberland Métis Council 44.199454 -77.499322
10 South East Developed and final Seven Rivers Métis Council 44.75857 -77.136169
11 Champlain Developed and final Ottawa Regional Métis Council 45.271757 -75.755603
12 North Simcoe Muskoka Developed and final Georgian Bay Métis Council 44.730123 -79.863716
12 North Simcoe Muskoka Developed and final Moon River Métis Council 44.686796 -79.547845
           
LHIN number Region Plan developed (ACS III: 2015-2019) Inuit Communities LATITUDE LONGITUDE
11 Champlain Developed and final Inuit Community Support 45.43402 -75.664
11 Champlain Developed and final Inuit Family Family Resource & health Promotion 45.43402 -75.664
11 Champlain Developed and final Inuit Tapirit Kanatami 45.422016 -75.695534
11 Champlain Developed and final Ottawa Health Services Network Inc. 45.37298 -75.7793
11 Champlain Developed and final Pauktuutit 45.42667 -75.6906
11 Champlain Developed and final Tungasuvvingat Inuit 45.41489 -75.7079

 

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercare.on.ca/common/pages/UserFile.aspx?fileId=345455)

 

Data Table 2. Northern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – development of a Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

LHIN number LHIN Plan developed (ACS III: 2015-2019) First Nation Communities Political Territorial Organization (PTO) LATITUDE LONGITUDE
13 North East Developed and final Atikameksheng Anishnawbek(Whitefish Lake) Union of Ontario Indians 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final Attawapiskat First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East Developed and final Aundeck Omni Kaning First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.98127 -81.933941
13 North East Developed and final Beaverhouse First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.150085 -80.033075
13 North East Developed and final Brunswick House First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final Chapleau Cree First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final Chapleau Ojibwe First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final Constance Lake First Nation Mattawa Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East Developed and final Dokis First nation Union of Ontario Indians 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final Flying Post First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
13 North East Developed and final Fort Albany First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East Developed and final Henvey Inlet First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.543968 -79.985727
13 North East Developed and final Hornepayne First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final Kashechewan First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East Developed and final Magnetawan First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.776781 -80.555012
13 North East Developed and final Marten Falls First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
13 North East Developed and final Matachewan First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.290885 -80.245239
13 North East Developed and final Mattagami First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East Developed and final M'Chigeeng First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.914623 -82.117269
13 North East Developed and final Michipicoten First nation Union of Ontario Indians 47.934956 -84.824509
13 North East Developed and final Missanabie Cree First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 46.517204 -84.271539
13 North East Developed and final Mississauga #8 First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.187529 -82.960079
13 North East Developed and final Mocreebec Council of the Cree nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.065525 -81.003754
13 North East Developed and final Moose Cree First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East Developed and final Nipissing First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.334299 -79.893772
13 North East Developed and final Ojibways of Batchewana (Rankin) Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 46.517204 -84.271539
13 North East Developed and final Ojibways of Garden River Union of Ontario Indians 46.517204 -84.271539
13 North East Developed and final Sagamok Anishnawbek First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.212829 -82.074116
13 North East Developed and final Serpent River First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.21246 -82.57444
13 North East Developed and final Shawanaga First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 45.414671 -80.092293
13 North East Developed and final Sheguiandah First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.88381 -81.916519
13 North East Developed and final Sheshegwaning First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.914623 -82.117269
13 North East Developed and final Taykwa Tagamou (New Post) Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.06522 -81.02895
13 North East Developed and final Temagami First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 47.065599 -79.789547
13 North East Developed and final Thessalon First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.265585 -83.542179
13 North East Developed and final Wahgoshig First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.597478 -79.979454
13 North East Developed and final Wahnapitae First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.705151 -80.929466
13 North East Developed and final Wasauksing First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.347454 -80.017486
13 North East Developed and final Weenusk First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East Developed and final Whitefish River First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.063591 -81.771767
13 North East Developed and final Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve Union of Ontario Indians 45.803181 -81.720718
13 North East Developed and final Zhiibaahaasing First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West Developed and final Animbiigoo Zaagi'igan Anishinaabek Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West Developed and final Anishinaabeg of Naongashiing(Big Island) Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.78299 -93.851973
14 North West Developed and final Aroland First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West Developed and final Bearskin Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Big Grassy First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.78299 -93.851973
14 North West Developed and final Biinjitiwaabik Zaaging Anishinaabek First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West Developed and final Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek(Sand Point) Union of Ontario Indians 48.42689 -89.247387
14 North West Developed and final Cat Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Couchiching First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.611849 -93.392509
14 North West Developed and final Deer Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Eabametoong First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West Developed and final Eagle Lake First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Fort Severn First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Fort William First nation,Nokiiwin tribal council Union of Ontario Indians 48.33427 -89.305997
14 North West Developed and final Ginoogaming First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West Developed and final Grassy Narrows First nation/Asubspeeschoseewagong Netum Anishnabek Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West Developed and final Iskatewizaagegan No. 39Independent First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West Developed and final Kasabonika Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Keewaywin First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek First nation Gull Bay Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West Developed and final Kingfisher Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug(Big Trout Lake) Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Koocheching First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Lac Des Mille Lacs First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.42689 -89.247387
14 North West Developed and final Lac La Croix First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.613748 -93.395654
14 North West Developed and final Lac Seul First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 50.111179 -91.901398
14 North West Developed and final Long Lake #58 First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.780531 -86.535049
14 North West Developed and final McDowell Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Mishkeegogamang First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Mitaanjigamiing (Stanjikoming) First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.613748 -93.395654
14 North West Developed and final Muskrat Dam First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Naicatchewenin First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.656279 -93.670769
14 North West Developed and final Namaygoosisagagun First nation Union of Ontario Indians 48.33427 -89.305997
14 North West Developed and final Naotkamegwanning Anishinabe First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.310921 -94.001617
14 North West Developed and final Neskantaga First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.219469 -87.891232
14 North West Developed and final Nibinamik First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.745831 -88.513889
14 North West Developed and final Nigigoonsiminikaaning First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.613748 -93.395654
14 North West Developed and final North Caribou Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.949999 -91.333332
14 North West Developed and final North Spirit Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.505474 -93.018906
14 North West Developed and final Northwest Angle No. 33 First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.789623 -94.469825
14 North West Developed and final Northwest Angle No. 37 First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West Developed and final Obashkaandagaang (Washagamis Bay) Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.776726 -94.5583
14 North West Developed and final Ochiichagwe'Babigo'ining nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.76469 -94.48011
14 North West Developed and final Ojibways of Onigaming (Sabaskong) Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West Developed and final Ojibways of Pic River (Heron Bay) Union of Ontario Indians 45.364399 -75.849895
14 North West Developed and final Pays Plat First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West Developed and final Pic Mobert First nation Union of Ontario Indians 47.162397 -81.776795
14 North West Developed and final Pikangikum First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 51.730911 -93.624153
14 North West Developed and final Poplar Hill First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Rainy River First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.592255 -92.83466
14 North West Developed and final Red Rock First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.01375 -88.262482
14 North West Developed and final Sachigo Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 53.871105 -92.204502
14 North West Developed and final Sandy Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 53.07645 -93.327137
14 North West Developed and final Saugeen First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West Developed and final Seine River First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 43.549879 -80.276329
14 North West Developed and final Slate Falls First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West Developed and final Wabaseemoong First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 50.17609 -94.911762
14 North West Developed and final Wabauskang First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West Developed and final Wabigoon First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.767601 -92.84169
14 North West Developed and final Wapekeka First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 53.844721 -89.530003
14 North West Developed and final Wauzhushk Onigum First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.789623 -94.469825
14 North West Developed and final Wawakapewin First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.100158 -91.917669
14 North West Developed and final Webequie First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.989124 -87.35891
14 North West Developed and final Whitesand First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 50.303915 -89.038986
14 North West Developed and final Whitewater Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.374357 -89.271414
14 North West Developed and final Wunnumin Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.939359 -90.791776

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercare.on.ca/common/pages/UserFile.aspx?fileId=345455)

 

Data Table 3. Southern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – percentage of core Health Tables engaged, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

LHIN number Region % engaged (ACS III: 2015-2019) First Nation Communities Political Territorial Organization (PTO) LATITUDE LONGITUDE
1 Erie St. Clair 100% Aamjiwnaang First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 42.9657 -82.391671
1 Erie St. Clair 100% Bkejwanong Territory (Walpole Island) Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 42.58976 -82.387253
1 Erie St. Clair 100% Caldwell First Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 42.039206 -82.589593
1 Erie St. Clair 100% Chippewas of Kettle & Stony Point Union of Ontario Indians 43.097971 -81.99934
1 Erie St. Clair 100% Delaware Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 42.551851 -81.976501
2 South West 90% Chippewas of Nawash Unceded (Cape Croker) Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 44.740129 -81.139782
2 South West 90% Chippewas of Saugeen Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 44.49774 -81.36985
2 South West 90% Chippewas of theThames Union of Ontario Indians 42.810329 -81.460022
2 South West 90% Munsee-Delaware Nation Union of Ontario Indians 42.819799 -81.435871
2 South West 90% Oneida Nation of the Thames Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 42.87455 -81.3308074
3 Waterloo Wellington 40% - - - -
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant 100% Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 43.574875 -79.704483
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant 100% Six Nations of the Grand River Territory Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 42.891138 -79.977137
5--6 Mississauga Halton--Central West 50% - - - -
7 Toronto Central 100% - - - -
8 Central 100% Chippewas of Georgina Island Union of Ontario Indians 44.304861 -79.361229
9 Central East 100% Alderville First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 44.199454 -77.499322
9 Central East 100% Curve Lake First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 44.624774 -78.133402
9 Central East 100% Hiawatha First Nation Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 44.240141 -78.163208
9 Central East 100% Mississaugas of Scugog Island Union of Ontario Indians 44.114758 -78.945436
10 South East 100% Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 44.19458 -77.04929
11 Champlain 100% Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.593347 -77.191787
12 North Simcoe Muskoka 100% Beausoleil First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 44.686796 -79.547845
12 North Simcoe Muskoka 100% Chippewas of Rama Independent /Unaffiliated First Nation 44.686796 -79.547845
12 North Simcoe Muskoka 100% Moose Deer Point First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.072514 -79.627613
12 North Simcoe Muskoka 100% Wahta Mohawks (Mohawks of Gibson) Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 45.152695 -79.481419

 

LHIN number Region % engaged (ACS III: 2015-2019) Métis Communities LATITUDE LONGITUDE
1 Erie St. Clair 100% Windsor Essex Métis Council 42.232803 -83.023308
2 South West 90% Great Lakes Métis Council 44.566215 -80.939613
3 Waterloo Wellington 40% Grand River Community Métis Council 43.690869 -80.371735
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant 100% Hamilton/Wentworth Métis Council 43.242023 -79.856201
4 Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant 100% Niagara Region Métis Council 42.990954 -79.250818
5--6 Mississauga Halton--Central West 50% Credit River Métis Council 43.642785 -79.629926
7 Toronto Central 100% Toronto Métis Council 43.727595 -79.30994
8 Central 100% - - -
9 Central East 100% Oshawa & Durham Region Métis Council 43.933059 -78.868285
9 Central East 100% Wapiti Interim Métis Council 44.624774 -78.133402
10 South East 100% Northumberland Métis Council 44.199454 -77.499322
10 South East 100% Seven Rivers Métis Council 44.75857 -77.136169
11 Champlain 100% Ottawa Regional Métis Council 45.271757 -75.755603
12 North Simcoe Muskoka 100% Georgian Bay Métis Council 44.730123 -79.863716
12 North Simcoe Muskoka 100% Moon River Métis Council 44.686796 -79.547845
           
LHIN number Region % engaged (ACS III: 2015-2019) Inuit Communities LATITUDE LONGITUDE
11 Champlain 100% Inuit Community Support 45.43402 -75.664
11 Champlain 100% Inuit Family Family Resource & health Promotion 45.43402 -75.664
11 Champlain 100% Inuit Tapirit Kanatami 45.422016 -75.695534
11 Champlain 100% Ottawa Health Services Network Inc. 45.37298 -75.7793
11 Champlain 100% Pauktuutit 45.42667 -75.6906
11 Champlain 100% Tungasuvvingat Inuit 45.41489 -75.7079

 

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercare.on.ca/common/pages/UserFile.aspx?fileId=345455)

 

Data Table 4. Northern Ontario: Aboriginal communities and groups – percentage of core Health Tables engaged, 2015 to 2019 (ACS III: 2015 to 2019)

LHIN number LHIN % engaged (ACS III: 2015-2019) First Nation Communities Political Territorial Organization (PTO) LATITUDE LONGITUDE
13 North East 100% Atikameksheng Anishnawbek(Whitefish Lake) Union of Ontario Indians 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% Attawapiskat First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East 100% Aundeck Omni Kaning First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.98127 -81.933941
13 North East 100% Beaverhouse First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.150085 -80.033075
13 North East 100% Brunswick House First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% Chapleau Cree First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% Chapleau Ojibwe First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% Constance Lake First Nation Mattawa Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East 100% Dokis First nation Union of Ontario Indians 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% Flying Post First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
13 North East 100% Fort Albany First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East 100% Henvey Inlet First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.543968 -79.985727
13 North East 100% Hornepayne First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% Kashechewan First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East 100% Magnetawan First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.776781 -80.555012
13 North East 100% Marten Falls First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
13 North East 100% Matachewan First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.290885 -80.245239
13 North East 100% Mattagami First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 47.162397 -81.776795
13 North East 100% M'Chigeeng First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.914623 -82.117269
13 North East 100% Michipicoten First nation Union of Ontario Indians 47.934956 -84.824509
13 North East 100% Missanabie Cree First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 46.517204 -84.271539
13 North East 100% Mississauga #8 First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.187529 -82.960079
13 North East 100% Mocreebec Council of the Cree nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.065525 -81.003754
13 North East 100% Moose Cree First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East 100% Nipissing First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.334299 -79.893772
13 North East 100% Ojibways of Batchewana (Rankin) Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians 46.517204 -84.271539
13 North East 100% Ojibways of Garden River Union of Ontario Indians 46.517204 -84.271539
13 North East 100% Sagamok Anishnawbek First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.212829 -82.074116
13 North East 100% Serpent River First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.21246 -82.57444
13 North East 100% Shawanaga First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 45.414671 -80.092293
13 North East 100% Sheguiandah First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.88381 -81.916519
13 North East 100% Sheshegwaning First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.914623 -82.117269
13 North East 100% Taykwa Tagamou (New Post) Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.06522 -81.02895
13 North East 100% Temagami First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 47.065599 -79.789547
13 North East 100% Thessalon First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.265585 -83.542179
13 North East 100% Wahgoshig First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.597478 -79.979454
13 North East 100% Wahnapitae First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.705151 -80.929466
13 North East 100% Wasauksing First nation Union of Ontario Indians 45.347454 -80.017486
13 North East 100% Weenusk First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.512515 -82.343755
13 North East 100% Whitefish River First nation Union of Ontario Indians 46.063591 -81.771767
13 North East 100% Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve Union of Ontario Indians 45.803181 -81.720718
13 North East 100% Zhiibaahaasing First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West 99% Animbiigoo Zaagi'igan Anishinaabek Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West 99% Anishinaabeg of Naongashiing(Big Island) Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.78299 -93.851973
14 North West 99% Aroland First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West 99% Bearskin Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Big Grassy First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.78299 -93.851973
14 North West 99% Biinjitiwaabik Zaaging Anishinaabek First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West 99% Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek(Sand Point) Union of Ontario Indians 48.42689 -89.247387
14 North West 99% Cat Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Couchiching First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.611849 -93.392509
14 North West 99% Deer Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Eabametoong First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West 99% Eagle Lake First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Fort Severn First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Fort William First nation,Nokiiwin tribal council Union of Ontario Indians 48.33427 -89.305997
14 North West 99% Ginoogaming First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West 99% Grassy Narrows First nation/Asubspeeschoseewagong Netum Anishnabek Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West 99% Iskatewizaagegan No. 39Independent First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West 99% Kasabonika Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Keewaywin First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek First nation Gull Bay Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 49.092593 -88.799891
14 North West 99% Kingfisher Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug(Big Trout Lake) Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Koocheching First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Lac Des Mille Lacs First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.42689 -89.247387
14 North West 99% Lac La Croix First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.613748 -93.395654
14 North West 99% Lac Seul First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 50.111179 -91.901398
14 North West 99% Long Lake #58 First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.780531 -86.535049
14 North West 99% McDowell Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Mishkeegogamang First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Mitaanjigamiing (Stanjikoming) First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.613748 -93.395654
14 North West 99% Muskrat Dam First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Naicatchewenin First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.656279 -93.670769
14 North West 99% Namaygoosisagagun First nation Union of Ontario Indians 48.33427 -89.305997
14 North West 99% Naotkamegwanning Anishinabe First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.310921 -94.001617
14 North West 99% Neskantaga First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.219469 -87.891232
14 North West 99% Nibinamik First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.745831 -88.513889
14 North West 99% Nigigoonsiminikaaning First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.613748 -93.395654
14 North West 99% North Caribou Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.949999 -91.333332
14 North West 99% North Spirit Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.505474 -93.018906
14 North West 99% Northwest Angle No. 33 First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.789623 -94.469825
14 North West 99% Northwest Angle No. 37 First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West 99% Obashkaandagaang (Washagamis Bay) Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.776726 -94.5583
14 North West 99% Ochiichagwe'Babigo'ining nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.76469 -94.48011
14 North West 99% Ojibways of Onigaming (Sabaskong) Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.727888 -94.473117
14 North West 99% Ojibways of Pic River (Heron Bay) Union of Ontario Indians 45.364399 -75.849895
14 North West 99% Pays Plat First nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West 99% Pic Mobert First nation Union of Ontario Indians 47.162397 -81.776795
14 North West 99% Pikangikum First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 51.730911 -93.624153
14 North West 99% Poplar Hill First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Rainy River First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 48.592255 -92.83466
14 North West 99% Red Rock First Nation Union of Ontario Indians 49.01375 -88.262482
14 North West 99% Sachigo Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 53.871105 -92.204502
14 North West 99% Sandy Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 53.07645 -93.327137
14 North West 99% Saugeen First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West 99% Seine River First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 43.549879 -80.276329
14 North West 99% Slate Falls First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.184393 -92.824782
14 North West 99% Wabaseemoong First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 50.17609 -94.911762
14 North West 99% Wabauskang First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.270094 -84.756271
14 North West 99% Wabigoon First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.767601 -92.84169
14 North West 99% Wapekeka First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 53.844721 -89.530003
14 North West 99% Wauzhushk Onigum First nation Grand Council Treaty # 3 49.789623 -94.469825
14 North West 99% Wawakapewin First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 50.100158 -91.917669
14 North West 99% Webequie First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.989124 -87.35891
14 North West 99% Whitesand First nation Independent/Unaffiliated First Nation 50.303915 -89.038986
14 North West 99% Whitewater Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 48.374357 -89.271414
14 North West 99% Wunnumin Lake First nation Nishnawbe-Aski Nation 52.939359 -90.791776

 

LHIN number LHIN % engaged(ACS III: 2015-2019) Métis Communities LATITUDE LONGITUDE
13 North East 100% Temiskaming Métis Council 47.44229 -79.642278
13 North East 100% Chapleau Métis Council 47.848445 -83.408789
13 North East 100% North Bay Métis Council 46.311257 -79.461772
13 North East 100% Norther Lights Métis Council 49.065631 -81.011975
13 North East 100% Sudbury Métis Council 46.49178 -81.004647
13 North East 100% Métis Nation of Ontario Timmins 48.469255 -81.327171
13 North East 100% North Channel Métis Council 46.300271 -83.791999
13 North East 100% Historic Sault Ste Marie Métis Council 46.517401 -84.340633
13 North East 100% Mattawa Métis Council 46.348637 -78.742714
14 North West 99% Kenora Métis Council 49.765738 -94.486376
14 North West 99% Geraldton & Area Métis Council 49.713317 -86.948722
14 North West 99% Atikokan & Surrounding Area Interim Métis Council 48.758514 -91.609742
14 North West 99% Sunset County Métis Council 48.609282 -93.392578
14 North West 99% Red Sky Métis Independent Nation 48.386295 -89.245818
14 North West 99% North Shore Métis Council 48.783366 -87.111591
14 North West 99% NorthWest Métis Nation of Ontario Council 49.784224 -92.839662
14 North West 99% Thunder Bay Métis Council 48.381998 -89.245475

 

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and Publicly Available Address Information

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. For information on address of each First Nation community, please consult the INAC First Nation Community Interactive Map (available at: http://fnpim-cippn.aandc-aadnc.gc.ca/index-eng.html)
  2. For information on address of each Métis community, please consult the Métis Nation of Ontario Community Council Map (available at: http://www.metisnation.org/community-councils/council-map/)
  3. For a more detailed map, please refer to the Aboriginal Cancer Strategy III (available at: https://www.cancercare.on.ca/common/pages/UserFile.aspx?fileId=345455)

 

Data Table 5. Implementing and sustaining the engagement process with core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables

Indicator Result Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan Developed All Core FNIM Health Tables engaged Sustainability structure developed
Sustainability Structure Yes 13 11 10
Sustainability Structure In Process 0 2 3

Report date: March 2018

Data source: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Prepared by: Cancer Care Ontario, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit

Note:

  1. ACS=Aboriginal Cancer Strategy

 

What do the results show?

  • Table 1 provides an overview of Relationship Protocols between Cancer Care Ontario and First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership. These documents formalize relationships with Aboriginal partners through mutual respect, recognition and understanding, and they highlight Cancer Care Ontario’s accountability and commitment to establishing strong foundational engagement structures necessary to achieve common goals and objectives.
  • The strength of the partnerships developed through the Relationship Protocols has ensured a sustained and ongoing dialogue that has been instrumental to the implementation of Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans that are resulting in improved access to services and person-centred care. These Protocols set a new course for the way that Cancer Care Ontario will engage and collaborate with First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups to address increasing cancer incidence and mortality rates among Ontario’s Aboriginal populations.

Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans have been developed in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples within all of the province’s 13 Regional Cancer Programs.

  • Figures 1 and 2 provide an overview of the development of Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans across Ontario.
  • The RCPs responsible for serving the 10 regions in Ontario with the highest First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations each developed Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans during the period of 2013 to 2015. For the period of 2015 to 2019, the ACCU has worked closely with each of the 13 RCPs in Ontario to develop updated Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans based on ACS III that reflect provincial and regional First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer control priorities.*
  • Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans are regional blueprints for making the cancer system work better for First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups in each region. Each plan is the result of close partnership and dialogue between the ACCU, RCPs and core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables. The collaborative and respectful engagement process employed to develop the Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans ensures that each plan represents the unique needs of (and belongs to) First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups in each region.

*Note: The Toronto Central North and Toronto Central South RCPs are combined.

Regional partnerships continue to be strengthened as most of the regions with Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans have engaged with all of the core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables in their respective regions to develop and implement this work together (Figures 3 and 4).

  • Figures 3 and 4 provide the percentage of core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables engaged by RCPs since the launch of ACS III in September 2015. This engagement process between the RCPs and core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables will continue throughout the lifetime of ACS III, and it will be supported by the ACCU’s Partnership Liaison Officers.
  • Throughout the lifetime of ACS II (2012 to 2015), the ACCU worked closely with the 10 regions in Ontario with highest First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations, and with the Central region. With expanded capacity as a result of hiring an additional Partnership Liaison Officer in early 2017, the ACCU has been working closely with all RCPs to provide direct support for relationship building and enhanced First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer control in every region in the province. Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plans have been developed with the remaining regions, focusing on the strategic priorities identified within ACS III.
  • A sustainable engagement structure (Figure 5) was developed when all core First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health Tables were engaged in the development of a Regional Aboriginal Cancer Plan. Together, they agreed to an established process that ensures the opportunity to provide ongoing guidance to the cancer system at the local level. Since the launch of ACS III in September 2015, sustainable engagement structures have been established in 10 regions in Ontario (Erie St. Clair, South West, Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant, Central, Central East, South East, Champlain, North Simcoe Muskoka, North East and North West).

Why is this important to Ontarians?

A foundation of trust and mutual respect between Cancer Care Ontario and Ontario’s First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership, Health Tables and communities is essential if we are to work together to improve cancer control for Aboriginal peoples in the province. For this reason, “Building productive relationships” is the First Strategic Priority of both ACS II and ACS III, and it is the foundational component of all work undertaken. In order to build, develop and maintain relationships with its First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners, Cancer Care Ontario recognizes First Nations, Inuit and Métis traditions and practices, and it honours the unique histories, cultures and diversity of Aboriginal peoples in Ontario.

The mechanisms outlined above that have been put in place by Cancer Care Ontario and RCPs set a course for a new relationship with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples, and they emphasize Cancer Care Ontario’s ongoing commitment to working appropriately, effectively and sustainably with First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Ontario. This approach is vital to ensuring that Ontario’s cancer system recognizes the First Peoples of this country, understands their unique needs and works with them in true partnership to address cancer control.

Find out more

  • The Cancer System Quality Index (CSQI) 2018 reports on the modifiable risk factors for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples.
  • To learn more about Cancer Care Ontario’s ACCU, click here.
  • To review the most recent Aboriginal Cancer Strategy (ACS III), click here.

Notes

  1. Tjepkema M, Wilkens R, Senécal S, Guimond É, Penney C. Mortality of Métis and Registered Indian adults in Canada: an 11-year follow-up study. Health Rep. 2009;20(4):31–51.
  2. Gionet L, Roshanafshar S. Study: select health indicators of First Nations people living off-reserve, Métis and Inuit 2007 to 2010. Ottawa: Stats Can; 2013.
  3. Registered Indian Population by Sex and Residence 2014 – Statistics and Measurement Directorate [Internet]. Ottawa: Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; 2015 May 21 [cited 2015 Sep 4]. Available from here.
  4. Statistics Canada. Data tables, 2016 Census. Catalogue no. 98-400-X2016155 [Internet]. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2017. Available from here.
  5. Chiefs of Ontario; Cancer Care Ontario. Cancer in First Nations in Ontario: risk factors and screening. Toronto: Chiefs of Ontario; 2016.
  6. Statistics Canada. Aboriginal peoples in Canada in 2006: Inuit, Métis and First Nations, 2006 Census [Internet]. Ottawa: Minister of Industry; 2008. Available from here.
  7. Statistics Canada. Data tables, 2016 Census. Catalogue no. 98-400-X2016164 [Internet]. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2017. Available from here.
  8. Aboriginal Peoples Survey 2012: Gender Differences in Inuit Education and Employment [Internet]. Ottawa: Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; 2015 February 6 [cited 2016 Nov 4]. Available from here.
  9. Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Honouring the truth, reconciling for the future: summary of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada [Internet]. Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada; 2015. Available from here.
  10. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. Aboriginal Peoples Survey 2012: Gender Differences in Inuit Education and Employment [Internet]. Ottawa: Government of Canada; 2015 [cited 2016 Nov 4]. Available from here.
  11. Statistics Canada. Aboriginal Peoples in Canada in 2006. Inuit, Métis and First Nations, 2006 Census. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2008.